WEATHER: Philadelphia, sunny, high of 80; Harrisburg, sunny, high of 80; Pittsburgh, partly cloudy, high of 81.

 

FROM CITY&STATE:

* C&S PA recaps yesterday’s Philadelphia Council session, where lawmakers considered a resolution denouncing Donald Trump’s “racism” while mulling strategies to combat lead contamination and monitor the use of future soda tax revenue.

 

NEW THIS MORNING:

* The US Supreme Court overturned a state court decision in the landmark Terry Williams murder trial, arguing that Philly ADA-turned-PA Supreme Court Justice Ron Castille should have recused himself from a review of the case, the Inquirer reports.

* Pittsburgh school officials are meeting to discuss the future of schools chief and former NFL-star Anthony Hamlet, who lied about his resume, the Post-Gazette reports.

* Public health advocates hailed the likely passage of a soda tax next week as a harbinger for similar laws in other municipalities, writes the Inquirer.

* A  court case over the suspension of a Pittsburgh cop has touched former Mayor Luke Ravenstahl and the city’s for public safety director, the Tribune-Review reports.

* Attorney General Kathleen Kane moved to dismiss a lawsuit filed against her by top agent Kevin Wevodau, according to the Times-Tribune.

* Labor talks continue between the state and its largest union, with a contract on schedule for ratification at the end of the month, according to the Patriot News.

* A deal in Harrisburg has a modified bill regulating shale gas extraction on deck for passage, according to the Gazette's Powersource blog.

* With the budget deadline looming, nonprofits burned by last year’s budget impasse begged legislators for a timely passage, the Patriot News writes.

* Lawmakers reintroduced a state anti-discrimination bill, the Patriot News reports.

* Pittsburgh is pushing hard for a $50 million federal grant to fund a transit plan that includes self-driving vehicles, writes the Post-Gazette.

* Third-party candidates may soon have a place on PA ballots, after a positive committee vote in Harrisburg, writes the Morning Call.

* Allentown is looking for a new vendor to take over a multimillion-dollar contract to compress municipal waste into a coal-like power source, according to the Morning Call.

* Erie’s treasurer is locked in a hiring dispute with the city’s mayor and has summoned a former mayor to represent her in court, according to the Erie Times-News.

 

THE PRESIDENTIAL RACE:

* Former PA Gov. Ed Rendell is taking flak again, this time for suggesting that US Sen. Elizabeth Warren was unfit to serve as vice president, writes the Inquirer.

* President Barack Obama formally endorsed Hillary Clinton, the New York Times reports.

* A new poll puts the Philly Phanatic ahead of Donald Trump in a presidential matchup, writes Philadelphia Magazine.

 

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EDITORIAL PAGES:

* State Rep. Nick Miccarelli has a powerful op-ed in the Daily Local News about how churches are attacking PA legislators for their support of HB1947, which makes it easier for sexual abuse victims to go after public and private institutions that allowed the crime. 

* The Daily Times sends kudos to Harrisburg for finally making sense when it comes to loosening up laws on wine purchases in supermarkets.

* In his Newsworks blog, Dick Polman takes a closer look into what Trump’s anti-Hispanic stance means to his chances and the GOP’s in November. 

* A York Dispatch editorial emphasizes that it is time to work harder than ever on ways to make police forces more diverse.

* The question of the day, via an Inquirer editorial: What else don’t we know about Philadelphia’s sugary drink tax, and where the derived revenue is going?

* In the wake of Ed Rendell’s testimony in the Chaka Fattah trial, a Daily News editorial looks at the role of quid pro quo in politics, both its present and future.

* The Post-Gazette writes about the clear and present danger of keeping Anthony Hamlet as Pittsburgh schools superintendent, calling for his immediate removal.

* An Intelligencer op-ed wants sugary-drink tax advocates to know that they can’t have it both ways: The tax is good for revenue or for health reasons, but it can’t be for both.

 

 

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HAPPY BIRTHDAY: PA Rep. Frank Farina (June 11) … Want to wish someone a happy birthday in our newsletter? Email us their name, job title and upcoming birthday at editor@cityandstatepa.com 

 

TODAY’S SKED: 

11 a.m. - Philadelphia City Council Legislative Oversight Committee will meet. Room 400, City Hall, Philadelphia.

11 a.m. - Mayor Kenney will be joined by Carol Lawrence and Jim Straw, co-chairs of the O.V. Catto Memorial Fund, to unveil the design of the statue memorializing O.V. Catto that will be erected on the apron of City Hall and introduce the artist, Branly Cadet. Mayor’s Reception Room, City Hall Room 202, Philadelphia.

1 p.m. - Philadelphia City Council Committee on Commerce & Economic Development will meet. Room 400, City Hall, Philadelphia.

5:30 p.m. - Mayor Kenney and the Pennsylvania Horticultural Society will speak about the impact PHS Pop Up Gardens have across Philadelphia. Viaduct Rail Park, 10th & Hamilton Streets, Philadelphia.

 

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KICKER: "Elizabeth Warren's problem would be the same problem I'd have. I mean, let's assume someone said, consider Gov. Rendell for vice president. I have no experience militarily, no experience in foreign affairs, and would be a difficult choice because if anything happened in week one and I became president, I would be lost.”  — Former Gov. Ed Rendell explains why he didn’t mean to offend Warren by saying she’d make a terrible president. From the Inquirer.