WEATHER: Philadelphia: thunderstorms, high of 87; Harrisburg: thunderstorms, high of 86; Pittsburgh: thunderstorms, high of 89.

NEW THIS MORNING:

* As the state’s General Assistance program comes to an end, worries are growing about what kind of impact the termination will have on lower-income Pennsylvanians, the Inquirer reports

* A GOP implosion in Pennsylvania has Republicans alarmed about President Donald Trump's reelection prospects in a state that proved essential to his 2016 victory, Politico writes.

* By counting prisoners as living in their prisons and not at their home addresses, Pennsylvania’s system for drawing political maps benefits white, rural voters at the expense of voters in urban areas, disproportionately affecting people of color, experts say, the Inquirer reports.

* The Pennsylvania State System of Higher Education is staring at an existing $62 million budget gap for 2019-20, but its students aren’t the ones who are going to fund it – the board voted to freeze tuition rates for the first time in 21 years, the Patriot-News writes.

* Philadelphia’s foreign-born population earned nearly $27 billion in 2017, according to a new report – up nearly $3 billion from 2016, and is part of a sustained increase in immigrants’ economic impact in the region, Billy Penn writes.

WHYY recaps what happened to the bills under consideration during Philadelphia City Council’s recently ended spring session.

* Pennsylvania Republicans are poised to select a new leader in Hershey this Saturday, and early indications are that the fight to replace Val DiGiorgio could be bruising, WESA reports.

* PA Auditor General Eugene DePasquale is urging state officials to end the Keystone Exams, saying they're not federally required and it's costing taxpayers nearly $100 million between 2015 and 2021, the AP reports.

* The Defender Association of Philadelphia filed a petition asking the state Supreme Court to end “unlawful” probation detainers and to reform the statewide practice it argues violates individuals’ fundamental rights to bail and to due process, the Inquirer reports.

* The Commonwealth Foundation, a conservative, think-tank in Harrisburg, identified at least $61 million in money hidden within the state budget, earmarked for everything from Lyme disease testing to public transit, the Capital-Star writes.

EDITORIAL PAGES:

* LancasterOnline calls out the deviously euphemistic provision in the new state budget that “allows schools to serve students alternative meals if they have an unpaid balance of $50 or more” for exactly what it is: the return of lunch-shaming.

HAPPY BIRTHDAY: … Want to wish someone a happy birthday in our newsletter? Email us their name, job title and upcoming birthday to editor@cityandstatepa.com

TODAY’S SKED:

10 a.m. - the PA Senate Local Government Committee will meet. Lancaster City Hall, 120 N. Duke St., Lancaster.

12 p.m. - Department of Health officials will bring together the academic clinical research centers and clinical registrants to discuss what research they will be conducting and how they hope those outcomes will help patients. Capitol Media Center, Commonwealth Ave, Harrisburg.

To have your events included in Today’s Sked, please email the information to editor@cityandstatepa.com.


KICKER: “Our position was much better two years ago. A blind man would see that. There isn’t sufficient staff … and they aren’t raising money.” – Mike Cibik, a state GOP committee member living in Philadelphia, gives voice to the concerns of many Republicans about the state of the party’s 2020 preparations. From Politico.