WEATHER: Philadelphia: mostly sunny, high of 41; Harrisburg: partly cloudy, high of 39; Pittsburgh: a.m. clouds, p.m. sun, high of 32.

 

NEW THIS MORNING:

* More than 2.5 million additional Pennsylvanians became eligible Tuesday for the coronavirus vaccine as both the state and Philadelphia broadened their distribution plans, but officials warned it would take time for people to get their shots because the federal government has not shipped enough doses. People 65 and older in Pennsylvania, some front-line workers and people 75 and older in Philadelphia – which is administering the vaccine independently – and anyone in the state or city 16 and older with a high-risk medical condition now qualify for inoculation, the Inquirer reports.

* Two Republicans were sworn into Pennsylvania’s row offices Tuesday, breaking eight years of Democratic control in some of the highest ranks of state government and bringing diversity, in more ways than one, to Harrisburg. In separate ceremonies, Stacy Garrity and Tim DeFoor were sworn in as the commonwealth’s new treasurer and auditor general, respectively, the Capital-Star reports.

* Within three hours of taking the oath of office at the start of his second term on Tuesday, Attorney General Josh Shapiro was it again, filing another lawsuit against President Donald Trump’s outgoing administration. This time, Shapiro and Illinois Attorney General Kwame Raoul, along with seven other attorneys general, filed a lawsuit to try to stop the U.S. Department of Labor rule that removes the limit on the amount of non-tipped work a tipped worker may complete and still receive only the tipped minimum wage of $2.13 per hour federally and $2.83 per hour in Pennsylvania, PennLive reports.

* In an extraordinary joint letter to the General Assembly, scores of labor unions, good government groups and progressive advocacy organizations are hitting back against a controversial change to the way Pennsylvania elects its appellate court judges, arguing that it’s a “massive threat to the independence of our judiciary,” the Capital-Star reports.

* Beset by state-ordered closures during the pandemic, casinos and other gambling operators in Pennsylvania reported a drop in 2020’s revenues of more than one-fifth the previous year, even as their take from online gambling and sports betting skyrocketed. Pennsylvania’s 13 operating casinos, fantasy sports operators and truck stops took in $2.65 billion in gross revenue in 2020, compared to $3.4 billion taken in by 12 casinos in 2019, the Pennsylvania Gaming Control Board said. That was a drop of 22%, the AP reports.

* After being frequently beset by insults and fraught politics in Pennsylvania, state Health Secretary Dr. Rachel Levine’s nomination to become a member of the Biden administration is a “new day for transgender America,” the Inquirer reports.

* State Rep. Ed Gainey announced Tuesday he is challenging Pittsburgh Mayor Bill Peduto in the Democratic primary, the Tribune-Review reports.

 

EDITORIAL PAGES:

* The Citizen asks if Philadelphia is ready for a Third Wave of political activism.

 

HAPPY BIRTHDAY: Want to wish someone a happy birthday in our newsletter? Email us their name, job title and upcoming birthday to editor@cityandstatepa.com

 

TODAY’S SKED:

10 a.m. - the Pittsburgh City Council Standing Committee will meet. Council Chambers, City-County Building, Pittsburgh.

2 p.m. - the Pittsburgh City Council Committee on Hearings will meet. Council Chambers, City-County Building, Pittsburgh.

 

To have your events included in Today’s Sked, please email the information to editor@cityandstatepa.com.

 

KICKER: “For Dr. Levine, the LGBT voices have been so loud in support of her that they drown out that negative. You see the tons of support and people that are countering that negativity with love and understanding.” – Celena Morrison, director of Philadelphia’s Office of LGBT Affairs. From the Inquirer.